In 1985 Joe Altobelli started Storm Davis on opening day, giving as his reason for so doing that hard throwers (like Davis) do better in cold weather than finesse pitchers, and therefore he wanted to get Davis more starts early in the season. In response to this, we will do a “match set” study which compared pitchers with identical won-lost records, one pitcher in each set being a hard thrower, and one pitcher being a finesse pitcher. For example, in 1963 Jim Maloney, a fire-balling youngster with 265 strikeouts, and the forty-two-year-old Warren Spahn each finished with a record of 23-7 on the season; they’re one set. Thirty additional matched sets were identified. The study found that the hard throwers had in fact performed dramatically worse in April than the finesse pitchers; worse in April but slightly better in May. From June through  August the two groups were almost even, and in September the hard throwers had performed much better, leading to an overall won-lost record which was identical for the two groups. The study was published on pages 134-36 of the 1986 Baseball Abstract.

Rowdy Element

About the time of  World War I the throwing of pop bottles and beer bottles at the players on the field became a very serious problem. John Heydler helped to bring it under control by devising a plan wherein the concessioners at the games, who sold the offending material, were asked to instruct their vendors to keep an eye out for the guilty parties; the league would prosecute and the vendors would serve as witnesses. References to the problem declined rapidly after that.

Black Sabbath

For several Sunday games in 1904 and 1905, the Dodgers evaded local Blue Laws by not charging admission to the games. (Laws which regulated what business could be done on Sunday were called Blue Laws.) Instead, they sold scorecards, which usually cost a nickel, for four different prices: a dollar, seventy-five cents, fifty cents, and a quarter. Describing the game of April 23, 1905, the New York Times reported that several dozen policemen were on hand, and the names of all players and scorecard sellers were taken down, but neither the police nor the Sabbath Observance Association attempted to stop the game. A crowd of 11,642 heathens were in attendance.

 

For several Sunday games in 1904 and 1905, the Brooklyn Superbas [Dodgers] evaded local Blue Laws by not charging admission to the games. (Laws which regulated what business could be done on Sunday were called Blue Laws.) Instead, they sold scorecards, which usually cost a nickel, for four different prices: a dollar, seventy-five cents, fifty cents, and a quarter. Describing the game of April 23, 1905, the New York Times reported that several dozen policemen were on hand, and the names of all players and scorecard sellers were taken down, but neither the police nor the Sabbath Observance Association attempted to stop the game. A crowd of 11,642 heathens were in attendance.

Bullpen

 
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